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Contents

History

Which Children and Youth Would We Profile

Why Would We Profile the Needs of Children/Youth

Who Would Use the Information and For What Purposes

When is a Profile Completed

How Often are Profiles Completed

Who Fills in the Profile

Where Does the Profile Go Once it is Completed

Where Do I Find a Copy of the Profile

How to Complete the Profile

Step 1: Regional Information

Step 2: Name, Date of Birth and Legal Status

Step 3: Primary Areas of Need

Step 4: Age/Grade

Step 5: Intrepretation of Degree of Need

Step 6: Where and Whether a Child’s/Youth’s Needs are Met

Step 7: Assistance to Move

Step 8: Behaviour

Step 9: Compensatory

Step 10: Well Being

Step 11: Personal Care

Step 12: Program Material

Step 13: Speech/Language/Audiology

Step 14: Technology

Step 15: Program

Summary

 

 

History

The Departments of Education, Health, Human Resources and Employment (HRE) and Justice endorsed the recommendations of the Classroom Issues Committee Report in June, 1995. This report identified the need for increased interagency cooperation, collaboration and communication.

One of the methods recommended to assist in the achievement of this goal was a child/ youth profile.

After you read the information in this handbook you will be in a position to explain to parents/guardians/significant others the rationale for the process, where the information goes, how the information is utilized and the benefits of the process for children/youth in your region.

This handbook is designed to provide an easy reference to help you find specific information quickly.

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Which children/ youth would we profile?

The children/youth who would be profiled would include those

< identified at risk by a professional or parent/guardian

< receiving support services from an employee/ agency of the Departments of Education, Health, Human Resources and Employment or Justice

< receiving two or more support services from two or more agencies of the Departments of Education, Health, Human Resources and Employment, and/or Justice

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Why would we profile the needs of children/youth?

The profile is designed to capture information on the needs of children including those who have Support Services Plans (see the Individual Support Services Planning (1997) handbook for the purpose of service and resource planning and problem solving.

The information from the profiles will enable a regional team, called the Regional Integrated Services Management Team, to:

< identify the needs of each community in the region.

< identify barriers to service delivery and problem solve around those issues.

< accurately represent the needs of the region to the regional boards and provincial departments of Government.

< identify enhancers and facilitators of good professional practice.

< evaluate with consumer input the effectiveness and efficiency of current policies and practice.

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Who would use the information and for what purposes?

There is a Regional Integrated Services Management Team which is comprised of representatives of the partner agencies and consumers. In general the composition of the Team will include the following members:

Consumers

Department of Human Resources and Employment

Regional Child Health Coordinator

Regional Community Health Board(s)

Regional Institutional Health Board(s)

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Royal Newfoundland Constabulary

School District(s)

This administrative team is vital in ensuring barriers to comprehensive coordinated service delivery are minimized or eliminated and resources are appropriately allocated and effectively utilized. This team will not have a direct service role.

In general, the Regional Integrated Services Management Team will:

C ensure that the needs of at-risk children are profiled yearly, resource implications identified and information used to determine support levels to each school/community.

C participate in the processes required to monitor and evaluate current enhancers and identify solutions to barriers, with respect to the delivery of support services to children and youth at the Regional level.

C liaise with the coordinator of the Provincial Integrated Services Management Team or their department representative when issues are unable to be solved locally, regionally or where they relate to current Departmental policies and/or guidelines.

C evaluate the effectiveness of the profiling process and make modifications which reflect the uniqueness of the region.

C determine the configuration of services required to ensure that the needs of children and youth are met and identify regional priorities for service delivery within current resource levels.

C identify and support the provision of professional development necessary to ensure collaborative practice among planning teams.

C ensure that the approach to service delivery is holistic and reduces fragmentation.

C monitor service provision to ensure an emphasis on prevention and strategies that enhance independent living.

C monitor service provision to ensure adherence to the principles of least intrusive intervention and minimizing the number of service providers for the child/parent.

C ensure that policies are in place to ensure timely and barrier free information sharing and monitor enforcement.

C hold the members accountable for their participation on the Regional Team, for the fulfilment of their Agency’s role and commitments and for the participation of their agency’s representatives on support services planning teams.

C negotiate the deployment of appropriate personnel on a Regional basis to ensure the needs of children/youth are met.

C develop a plan to ensure access to materials, equipment, resources not currently available in the region but required to meet the needs of children/youth.

C project future regional requirements.

C develop a plan to evaluate service effectiveness and service coordination.

C forward a report to the Provincial Integrated Management Team by January 31 of each year.

There is also a Provincial Integrated Services Management Team. This team is comprised of a representative of each of the signing Departments of Government. This team reports to a committee of Deputy Ministers and will use the profile information to:

C develop an understanding of the region’s needs.

C develop a provincial profile.

C represent district/ regional strengths and needs to the Deputy Ministers.

C facilitate the maintenance of a database of information that can be utilized to accurately project future regional/provincial service requirements.

C anticipate requirements for materials, equipment, resources, programs and services to meet the needs of children/youth.

C ensure that interventions are prioritized within current fiscal and personnel allocations.

C facilitate comprehensive collaborative planning between representatives of various Board’s/Department’s/Agencies at local, regional and provincial levels.

C support districts/regions in planning the continuum of services to meet their unique community/regional needs.

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When is a profile completed?

A profile is completed when

< a service provider is aware that a child/youth is at risk and the child’s/ youth’s needs have to be monitored.

< a service provider begins to interface with a child/ youth by providing a direct service.

< when a child/youth is receiving two or more services from two or more agencies.

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How often are profiles completed?

Initially and once yearly after that point. The Regional Integrated Services Management team may give specific directions in this regard. Therefore, check with your supervisor for specific directions.

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Who fills in the profile?

If you are aware that a child/youth is at risk and you are monitoring the child’s/youth’s needs, you should ensure that the child’s/youth’s needs are profiled.

If you are the only professional providing direct service to a child/youth then, as outlined in the Individual Support Services Planning document, whoever is designated as the Individual Support Services Manager should complete the profile. That could be the professional, parent or child/youth.

If the child/youth is receiving two or more services from two or more agencies then the Individual Support Services Manager will assume the responsibility of filling in the profile. If you are not the manager, then your responsibility in a team meeting is to assist the team in accurately reflecting the child’s/ youth’s needs on the profile form.

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Where does the profile go once it is completed by the professional or Individual Support Services Manager?

The completed profile, initially and yearly, is sent to the Regional Child Health Coordinator in your region. (See  address)

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Where do I find a copy of this profile?

A sample profile is found on the next page. Do not attempt to fill out this form as it has been reduced in size. It should be enlarged to 8 1/2 x 14 before attempting to complete the form. Also, read the instructions which follow the form before attempting to complete it to ensure accuracy.

The profile is available Profile if this is an easier format for you. If you keep a copy of the information submitted on disk, it can be easily utilized the following year to update relevant components before submission to the Regional Child Health Coordinator.

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How to Complete the Profile

  Remember:

Review the form and read the instruction related to each action before completing it

This form is designed to:

 

This form is not designed to:

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Step 1: Regional Information

 

Question:  Have you enlarged the form to 8 1/2 x 14 ? If not, do this before proceeding or complete the form on a disk as provided

(enter #1 here)

 

Community

Community refers to the place where the child resides.

(enter #2 here)

 

Region

This refers to the region of the province being coordinated by the Regional Integrated Services Management Team.

The child’s region is determined by his/her community of residence not by the community in which he/she receives services.

Example:  If a child lives in a community in one region (eg. Foxtrap which is in the Eastern Region) and attends a pre-school that is in another region then you would fill in Eastern in the blank on the form.

Early Childhood Program/School (ECP)

Remember:  Early Childhood program refers to pre-schools, family recource centres, nursery schools, early intervention programs, pre-kindergarten programs

If the child is between 0 and 6 and attends an early childhood program, write the name of the program in the blank. If the early childhood program is in a school and has the same name as the school, write the name of the school in the blank and write the initial ECP (early childhood program) after it to make the distinction.

If the child/youth is attending school or is registered in a school but is not attending school because of exceptional circumstances, write the name of the school in the blank.

 

School District

Remember: If you want to reduce writing/typing requirements feel free to insert the number of the school district

Some regions contain more than one school district. Therefore, it is important to write in the name and/or number of the school district in which the child/youth is registered even if he/she is home schooled, absent from school or confined to home.

Date of Profile

This refers to the day, month and year you are completing the profile.

Remember:  Only one profile has to be completed each year

Only one profile needs to be completed each year. Remember this is a snapshot of the needs of children/youth in the district at a point in time. The regional team recognizes that children’s/youth’s needs are not stagnant, but they do not need any more than one profile per year. 

Date of Profile (D/M/Y)_______

Completed By (ISSM) ________

Telephone # _______________

Completed by

The philosophy of the Model for the Coordination of Services to Children and Youth is one of prevention and early intervention. Recognizing this, the intent is to profile, with parent’s/guardian’s permission, the needs of children and youth at risk or receiving direct services from one of the partner departments or agencies.

If you are the professional monitoring the needs of a child/youth or if you are the only professional providing services to the child and acting as the individual support services manager or if you are the individual support services manager of a larger team then you would be responsible for filling out the profile. Therefore, your name would appear on the blank.

Example:
Date of Profile:(D/M/Y) 20/10/98
Completed by (ISSM) Brenda Short (Social Worker)
Telephone # (709) 807-1234
Fax # (709) 807-9876

Telephone #

This is a telephone number where you can be reached by day. If you have a facsimile number and that is more convenient for you please write that number and put the initial (F) after it to indicate that it is not a telephone number.

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Step 2: Name, Date of Birth, Legal Status

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completed the following information asked for in Step 1?

C community
C region
C early childhood program/school
C school district
C date of profile (D/M/Y)
C completed by (ISSM)
C telephone #

 

* In the space provided print/type the child’s first, middle and surname. If the child uses two surnames, note both and asterisk the legal name.

Since there can be more than one child/youth with the same name, you are being asked to fill in the child’s/youth’s date of birth giving the day first then the month and finally the year (D/M/Y).

The final piece of information required in the box is the child’s/youth’s legal status. If the child is:

 

Example:
In the box below, you will note that the child’s name is Jane Sara Joy. She was born on the 24 July, 1990 and she is a foster child
Name:                                    

Date of Birth:                          

Legal Status:                           

Jane Sara Joy
24/07/90
FC

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Step 3: Primary areas of need

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                       completed Step 2 by filling in the child’s/youth’s name, date of                          birth and legal status ?

Note: The primary areas of need are listed on the bottom left of the form

 Yes, a child/youth can have more than one primary of need

All areas of need have been listed under one of the following areas:

A                   - Academic Learning Difficulty
At                  - Attendance
B                   - Behaviour
C                   - Cognitive Delay
D                   - Developmental Delay (Age 0 - 8)
E                   - Environmental
G                   - Gifted
H                   - Hearing
He                 - Health
L.D.              - Learning Disability
M.H.             - Mental Health
P                   - Physical
S &/or L      - Speech &/or Language
V                   - Victim
Vi                  - Visual
U                   - Unknown

You may need to write/type more than one code in the space provided in order to express the complexity of the child’s/youth’s needs

Some needs are transient in nature. This means that the need will be time limited. For example, a child/youth may be involved in an accident and as a result may wear a cast or be wheelchair bound for a period of time. Under these or any circumstance where it is known that the need will exist for a specific period, you would note "T" after the disability area.

Example:
* The child/youth referred to in the example below has a transient (T) visual condition (Vi) and a learning disability (LD)

 

Primary areas of need (note "T" by the area if need transient)
                                           

 VI (T), L.D.

 

The following is a description of each of the primary areas of need:

 

Academic Learning Difficulty

Academic Learning Difficulty refers to children/youth who are at risk of a learning difficulty when they enter school or children/youth who are experiencing difficulty in one or more subject areas. You do not have to specify the subject area in the column. You write "A" in the column. This notation would be used when the reason for learning difficulty is unknown.

Attendance

Attendance refers to the pre-school/school aged child/youth under 16 years of age who is registered in a early childhood program/school but attends sporadically. It can also refer to the school aged child/youth who refuses to come to school for avariety of reasons.

Where this is the area of concern or one of the areas of concern, note "At" in the space provided.

 

Behaviour

Note "B" in the space provided if the child’s/youth’s behaviour is an area of grave concern to parents/guardians and/or caregivers.

There is no need to question why the child’s/youth’s behaviour is not within the norms expected for his developmental/chronological age. That is a separate question and would be addressed when developing the child’s/youth’s support services plan.


Cognitive Delay

During the pre-school years, caregivers may be unable to determine the exact reasons for a child’s lag in development. Where this is the case, you may wish to indicate developmental delay "D" rather than "C" as one of the primary areas of need.

Cognitive delay "C" would refer to children/youth who present with mild, moderate, severe or profound mental handicaps.

This does not have to be a life long area of need. Changes in circumstances and or intense intervention could eliminate this as a primary area of need.

Children/youth with cognitive delay are characterized by the following:

a) significantly subaverage intellectual functioning

existing concurrently with

b) related limitations in two or more of the following applicable adaptive skill domains:

- functional academics
- communication
- self half/daily living
- gross/fine motor
- social/emotional

and

c) manifesting itself before age 18

Developmental Delay

Developmental delay "D" can only be used when a child is between the ages of 0 and 8. It is a primary area of need when the cause of a child’s developmental lag is unknown. Early identification and intense intervention are the keys to eliminating it as a primary area of need. Where the developmental delay persists beyond eight years of age, the reason(s) is usually known and should be indicated in this column.

Developmental delay is defined as a condition which represents a significant delay in the process of development. It does not refer to a condition in which a child is slightly or momentarily lagging in development. The presence of developmental delay is an indication that the process of development is significantly affected and that without special intervention, it is likely that the child’s ability to attain normal developmental milestones and educational performances at school would be jeopardized.

 

 

Environmental

"E" is indicated as a primary area of need where environmental deprivation is considered, at this point in time, to be the primary or one of the primary areas of need.

This area of need may or may not persist throughout the child’s/youth’s life span. It is influenced by factors such as:

 

Gifted

"G" refers to a child/youth who has a special gift or an exceptional ability to learn. For example, a parent/guardian or early childhood worker may share that a child can read fluently at the age of three and can converse freely with an adult. This presents a challenge in the early childhood program and the home.

Children/youth will present with special gifts which are physical, verbal, social, mathematical, linguistic, musical and/or academic in nature. This energy must be channeled constructively and supported positively.

Children/youth with exceptional abilities are characterized by the following:

a) well above average ability (specific abilities and/or general cognitive ability)

and/or

b) high levels of task commitment (perseverance, endurance, determination, dedication and practice)

and/or

c) high levels of creativity

The child/youth demonstrates or has the potential to demonstrate an exceptional ability to learn, to be creative, to lead, to perform (psychomotor or artistic) and/or to think critically in one or more areas of human endeavour. Exceptional ability is dynamic, thus it may or may not be readily observable. It may only become evident when the child is exposed to an experience that evokes his/her potential.

 

Hearing

You would note "H" as a primary area of need where the child/youth is hard of hearing or deaf. In particular where the child with a hearing impairment presents the following characteristics:

a) a better ear average loss of 40 db.

b) a better ear average less than 40 db. will be assessed to determine need.

 

Health

"He" would appear as a primary area of need where a known health impairment is influencing the child’s/youth’s growth and development or performance in activities of daily living such as self-care or leisure and recreation activities and/or program activities. Children/youth with diabetes, asthma, ulcers, colitis, migraines, seizure disorders or other health disorders (there are too many to list in this text) may require supports periodically or throughout their developing years.

Where knowledge of the disorder would require the caregiver to take special precautions or provide services such as the administration of medication or supervision of nutritional intake, it should appear in this column on the profile.

Not all health disorders are primary areas of need because the child/youth is able to manage his/her care without adult intervention or support.

Learning Disability

The code "LD" would appear in the column where the child/youth is known to have a learning disability.

The following definition is used to identify children/youth as having primarily a learning disability:

Specific learning disability means a disorder in one or more of the basic psychological processes involved in understanding or in using language, spoken or written, which may manifest itself in an imperfect ability to listen, think, speak, read, write, spell, or to do mathematical calculations, The term includes such conditions as perceptual handicaps, brain injury, minimal brain dysfunction, dyslexia, and developmental aphasia. The term does not include children who have problems that are primarily the result of visual, hearing, or motor disabilities, or mental retardation, emotional disturbance, or of environmental, cultural, or economic disadvantages.

 

Mental Health

Mental health (MH) is used to refer to disorders which are psychological in nature. It would include schizophrenia, depression, bulimia, anorexia nervosa, manic depression, phobias, addictions to drugs and/or alcohol or any other area of need which requires the interventions of psychologist and/or a mental health professional.

 

Physical Disability

Areas of need which would indicate that you would indicate as "P" in this column include muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, spina bifida, osteogenesis imperfecta, spinal cord injuries, as well as many genetic disorders. Children/youth who have a physical disability as a primary area of need are those who have an acquired or congenital physical and/or motor impairment; disabilities such as cerebral palsy, myelomeningocele (spina bifida), muscular dystrophy, arthritis, amputations, congenital anomalies, osteogenesis imperfecta, arthrogryposis and others would be included.

The disabilities may interfere with the normal function of the bones, and/or muscles and/or joints and may also include impairments of the central nervous system.

Physical characteristics may include: paralysis, altered muscle tone, sensory disturbances, an unsteady gait, non-ambulation requiring alternate means of mobility, loss of, or inability to use one or more limbs, poor gross, fine and/or oral-motor control.

The impairment may range from mild to severe and may have a minimal impact on the child or interfere substantially with functional ability. The effects of the disability may be minimized through appropriate environmental adaptations and/or the use of assistive devices.

A child/youth with a physical disability may have other accompanying disabilities, e.g., a visual or hearing impairment, a learning disability, cognitive delay, speech language difficulties, or may have multiple disabilities and these should be profiled under the appropriate primary areas of need.

 

Speech and/or Language and/or Audiology

Children and youth have difficulties in the areas of articulation, voice, fluency or those whose needs result from the fact that they cannot communicate verbally (non verbal) and those requiring an audiological (hearing) profile would have their needs noted here.

Examples are children/youth who stutter, those that are unable to make certain sounds (articulation), speak clearly (fluency), or where an audiological (hearing) profile is required to see if the difficulties experienced are a result of a hearing deficit. More specifically a child/youth with speech and/or language delays/disorders present with one or more of the following:

a) Speech sound disorders: These problems involve both articulatory disorders and phonological disorders.

b) Fluency disorders: These are characterized by repetitions, prolongations, or blocks that interrupt the forward flow of speech or any abnormal disruptions in the normal rhythmic flow of speech that are noticeable and not controlled by the child.

c) Voice disorders: Deviations in pitch, pitch patterns, range of pitch, vocal quality, loudness or loudness patterns constitute voice disorders.

d) Language delays/disorders: Impairment or deviant development of comprehension and/or use of spoken, written and/or other symbol system. The disorder may involve the form content or use of language.

 

Victim

The code "V" is used where a child/youth is known to be or has been a victim of physical and/or sexual and/or emotional abuse or neglect.

 

Visual

The code "Vi" is used where the child/youth has a visual impairment which will influence his/her growth and development and/or performance. This code would be used where the child/youth presents with the following characteristics:

a) best corrected visual acuity is less than or equal to 20/70
b) has a visual field of less than 20 degrees

 

Unknown

This column will be used when you can describe a child’s/youths needs by filling in the profile but you are unaware of their exact nature. Perhaps families can describe their child’s/youth’s needs but have been unsuccessful in finding out the causative factors or diagnosis. They know that they have concerns and want caregivers to take the necessary steps to support their child/youth. In such cases note "U" in the column and proceed to describe the child’s/youth’s needs.

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Step 4: Age/Grade

stop.gif (1277 bytes)Have you
  • completed step 3?
  • written or entered the child’s/youth’s primary area(s) of need?
  • noted "T" after an area where the need is known to be temporary?

In this box on the form or the appropriate space in the computer program, note the preschooler’s age. Where the child/youth is of school age, note his/her age and grade. You are also being asked to note "R" after the grade where the child/youth is repeating or has repeated a grade(s) in school or "A" where the child/youth has been accelerated in school., eg. 9,3 (R). This child is 9 years old, in grade 3 and has repeated a grade in school. 9, 5 (A) - This child is 9 years old, in grade 5 and has been accelerated in school.

Next you are being asked to note a child’s/youth’s status in order to denote whether he/she is:

a) in full-time attendance at an early childhood program or school

b) in attendance part-time at an early childhood program or school

c) home schooled (being taught at home)

d) confined to home (this would be in cases where the child/youth is too medically fragile to be regular attendance at an early childhood program or school

* The example on the left indicates that this child is 9 years of age, in grade 5. He/she has been accelerated (A) and being home schooled (c).

If the box at the left had read 3a, it would indicate that the child is three years of age and attends an early childhood program full-time.

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Step 5: INTERPRETATION OF THE DEGREE OF NEED

                         Did you complete Step 4 by noting
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  • the child’s/youth’s age?
  • grade?
  • "R" if the child/youth is repeating/has repeated a grade?
  • "A" if the child/youth was accelerated?
  • "a" if the he/she attends an early childhood program /school full-time?
  • "b" is he/she attends a early childhood program/school part-time?
  • "c" is he/she is home schooled?
  • "d" is the child/youth is confined to home?

Before attempting to fill in the remainder of the profile, please read the following information which will assist in interpreting the child’s/youth’s degree of need in each area addressed in these nine columns headed:

Assistance to Move (physical)
Behaviour
Compensatory Skills
Well Being
Personal Care
Program Material
Speech/Language/Audiology
Technology
Program

The information contained in this section is designed as a guide for individuals determining the current level of support required by a child/youth. The use of this guide will ensure that the interpretation of the levels of support will be consistent from area to area in the province.

The various levels of need and each primary area of need are described: cognitive delay, developmental delay, emotional behavioural disorders, environmental deprivation, exceptionally able, hearing impairments, learning disabilities, physical disabilities, speech and language, visual impairments.

 Note:
Where hours are given it must be remembered that these refer to supports required outside those available naturally at home, in the community, at the ECP or school (not supports that could be used but are not required) and it is a culmination of those required at home, at theECP/school and in the community

 

Children/Youth with Academic Learning Difficulty - A

The identification process yields information on the anticipated levels of support required by each child/youth with an academic learning difficulty. This information is used to organize and prioritize services. The following system is used to profile the level of intensity of supports required in specific areas for children/youth with academic learning difficulties:

 

Level 1 : Intermittent

Children/youth would be unable to keep pace with their peers without an average of 1 to 6 hours of direct support. This support does not have to be 1:1 but it must be in a small group setting. These children can keep pace with their peers with this level of support and may not require this support every week of the year. This support would be required in certain areas of learning only.

 

Level 2 : Limited

Children/youth who require Level 2 supports require 7 to 12 hours of support per week if they are to keep pace with their peers. This support does not have to be 1:1 but must be in a small group setting. These children/youth can complete the learning outcomes/expectations when time frames are expanded. These children have ISSPs. When in school they require courses to be modified and method of output and evaluation modified.

 

Level 3 : Extensive

Children/youth who require Level 3 supports require 13 to 18 hours of support per week if they are to master the objectives of their program. They require an ISSP. If they are of school age they require enrollment in alternate and modified courses and must receive instruction in a small group setting

 

Level 4 : Pervasive

Children/youth who require Level 4 supports require 19 or more hours of support per week if they are to master the objectives of their program. They require an ISSP. If they are of school age they require enrollment in all alternate courses or an alternate curriculum and instruction in a small group setting. They may require access to instruction in alternate group settings.

 

 

Attendance - At

The identification process yields information on the anticipated levels of support required by each child/youth who does not attend the early childhood program/school as scheduled. The following system is used to profile the level of support required:

 

Level 1 : Intermittent

This level refers to children/youth who are sporadically absent from the early childhood program/school for up to 6 hours per week without a known bonafide reason. Supports are required either at home, in transit or in the day program for an average of 1 to 6 hours per week if the child is going to be in regular attendance.

 

Level 2 : Limited

This level refers to children/youth who are absent from the early childhood program/school on a regular basis or up to 6 days without a known bonafide reason. Supports are required either at home, in transit or in the day program for an average of 7 to 12 hours per week if the child/youth is going to be in regular attendance.

 

Level 3 : Extensive

This level refers to children/youth who are absent from the early childhood program/school at least 1/2 of the time without a bonafide reason. Supports are required either at home, in transit or in the day program for an average of 13 to 18 hours per week if the child/youth is going to be in regular attendance.

 

Level 4 : Pervasive

This level refers to children/youth who are constantly (full-time) absent from the early childhood program/school without a bonafide reason. In cases such as these, parents/caregivers may express that they cannot get their child/youth to attend. Supports are required either at home, in transit or in the day program for an average of 19 or more hours per week if the child/youth is going to be in regular attendance.

 

 

Children/Youth who have Behavioural Difficulties/Disorders

The identification process yields information on the anticipated levels of support required by each child/youth presenting with a behavioural difficulty/disorder. This information is used to organize and prioritize services. The following system is used to profile the level of intensity of supports required:

 

Level 1 : Intermittent

Level 1 means that this child/youth requires between 1 and 6 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

 

It may be difficult to distinguish the child/youth with an emotional/behavioural disorder from the child reacting to a particular psycho-social stressor. The behaviours exhibited may interfere with the child’s learning or performance or may result in minor disruptions in the early childhood/school setting. Initial interventions may include feedback to the child/youth, corrective/instructional discipline, contact with parents, counselling, and modifications to the learning environment. These interventions are recorded in an individual support services plan.

 

Level 2 : Limited

Level 2 means that this child/youth requires 7 to 12 hours of service per week, it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required

 

Students with behavioural difficulties/disorders who require limited support have an ISSP reflecting modified approaches to intervention strategies/instruction and/or practice within the program domains of concern. Modifications are implemented assisting the child/youth to work cooperatively within the normal, early childhood context/regular classroom. The child/youth may be losing valuable time on task interfering with progress. A mentoring program may be considered to keep the child/youth on track.

 

Level 3 : Extensive

Level 3 means that this child/youth requires 13 to 18 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required

 

Children/youth with emotional behavioural disorders who require extensive support have ISSPs that entail significant modification to learning (academic) and/or behavioural programming in school or early childhood. In the short-term, ISSPs may emphasize counseling and behaviour modification as much as concept development/academics. Behavioural outcomes may take precedence over concept development/academic outcomes at this level of intervention. Caregivers are given extensive consultative support in events in a non-violent manner. Supervision may need to be provided during unstructured time (e.g., snack time/recess, lunch). Social skills training is utilized to address performance and skill deficits. This would follow a systematic behaviour change plan.

 

Level 4 : Pervasive

Level 4 means that this child/youth requires 19 or more hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required

Children/youth with emotional behavioural disorder who require Level 4 support have ISSPs that reflect intense intervention. Programs for these children/youth may entail:

 

 

a) the assignment of a support worker/student assistant (not necessarily 1:1)
b) a 24 hour support services plan designed and implemented between agencies
c) instruction in alternate settings for varying time intervals
d) social skills training designed to meet the individual needs of the child/youth
e) strong emphasis on control or regulation of overt behaviour patterns prior to addressing other aspects of behavioural system
f) a planned response system for violent/assaultive behaviours that is designed to promote the maximum protection for the child/youth, the adult caregiver and the child’s/youth’s peers

 

 

Children/Youth who are Cognitively Delayed

The identification process yields information on the anticipated levels of support required by each child/youth with cognitive delay. This information is used to organize and prioritize services. The following system is used to profile the level of intensity of supports required in specific areas for children/youth with cognitive delay.

 

Level 1 : Intermittent

Level 1 means that this child/youth requires between 1 and 6 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

When a child/youth requires Level 1 support it means:

a) supports are provided on an "as needed" basis
b) short-term supports will be needed during transitions (e.g., moving to a new early childhood program/school, from school-to-work transition, when prerequisite skills are needed, bridging the gap between the early childhood program/school and other environments)
c) children/youth can complete some of the early childhood activities/curriculum with the same time frame as his/her peers with supports "as needed" especially during the primary years (0-8)
d) supports may include:

 

Level 2 : Limited

Level 2 means that this child/youth requires 7 to 12 hours of service per week, it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

When children/youth require Level 2 support it means:

a) supports are consistent over time

b) interventions may require fewer staff members and less cost than more intense levels of support

c) they

i) can complete the program expectations/curriculum within a modified time frame with a consistent level of support (e.g., materials adaptations)

or

ii) have an Individual Support Services Plan for aspects of their program

d) their supports may include:

 

Level 3 : Extensive

Level 3 means that this child/youth requires 13 to 18 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

When child/youth requires Level 3 support it means:

a) supports encompass regular (e.g, daily) involvement in more than one environment (e.g., learning environment, home, community)

b) supports are not time-limited (eg., long-term preschool/school support and long-term home living support)

c) the child/youth require ISSPs detailing significant program/curriculum modification (including alternate courses/subjects) and/or counsellling and behaviour modification plans. Their ISSPs may include other environmental adaptations, resource materials modifications, specialized equipment and technology, etc.

d) continual support from personnel across a variety of environments is needed to ensure that learning is taking place

e) supports will include some or all of the following:

 

Level 4 : Pervasive

Level 4 means that this child/youth requires 19 or more hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

When children/youth require Level 4 support it means:

a) supports which are constant and high intensity

b) support are required across all environments

c) these children/youth have

             i) an Individual Support Services Plan. For school-aged children/youth it should detail an alternate curriculum or a complete set of alternate courses
            ii) 24 hour support service plan designed and implemented between agencies

d) supports will include some of the following:

 

 

Children/Youth who are Developmentally Delayed

The identification process yields information on the anticipated levels of support required by each child, from birth to 8 years of age, with developmental delay. This information is used to organize and prioritize services. The following system is used to profile the level of intensity of supports required in specific areas for children with developmental delay.

 

Level 1: Intermittent

Level 1 means that this child requires between 1 and 6 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

When a child requires Level 1 support, it means one or more of the following:

a)    supports need to be provided on an "as needed" basis.

b)    short-term supports will be needed during transitions (e.g. moving to a new early childhood program/school.

c)    experiences will need to be provided to compensate for the lack of past experiences.

d)    there has been a temporary disruption in the ability of the parent/guardian to provide the child with experiences/care and supports.

e)    the child is lagging in attaining the normal developmental milestones and short term intervention will assist the child in closing the gap

f)    supports may include:

    -registration in an early childhood program
    - assistance to attend a program offered under the auspices of the Canadian Action Plan for Children
    -in home support by the provision of respite care
    - in home support to provide the child with toys and experiences to facilitate development
    -access to community based programs and services
    -feedback to the child re his/her behaviour
    -monitoring of skills in all areas of daily living; self help, gross and fine motor, language and communication, social, emotional.

 

Level 2: Limited

Level 2 means that this child youth requires 7 to 12 hours of service per week: it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

When a child, between birth and 8 years of age, requires Level 2 support it means:

a)    supports must be provided on a consistent basis.

b)    interventions may require fewer staff members and cost less than Level 3 or 4 supports

c)    the child can grow and develop within a modified time frame with these consistent supports.

d)    the child has an ISSP

e)    their supports may include
    - compensatory skill instruction because of a suspected or known sensory impairment
    -direct instruction or the provision of experiences which will facilitate independence in the areas of activities of daily living, peer interactions, play, and language/communication
    - participation in activities which will enhance the development of a positive self concept and positive self esteem.

 

Level 3: Extensive

Level 3 means that this child requires 13 to 18 hours of service per week : it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

When a child requires Level 3 support it means:

a)    supports will encompass regular involvement in at least some environments (e.g.. home, early childhood program/school, community)

b)    supports will not be time limited (they will be long term)

c)    there is an ISSP in place

d)    without support and structured interventions the opportunity to grow and develop would be jeopardized.

e)    supports will include some of the following
    - ongoing concept/academic and compensatory skill instruction
    - provision of low tech (such as magnifiers, specialized toys, switches, communication boards) or high tech equipment/materials such as computers, wheelchairs, standing frames, FM units for the hearing impaired)
    - ongoing intervention in communication and language based skills
    - social skills instruction and modeling
    - direct therapeutic interventions such as occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech and language instruction, behaviour management, orientation and mobility.

 

Level 4: Pervasive

Level 4 means that this child, aged between 0 and 8 years, requires 19 or more hours of service per week. it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

When a chid requires Level 4 support it means:

a)    supports which are constant and high intensity

b)    supports are required across all environments

c)    he/she has an ISSP in place. For a school age child, it means that the child is taking alternate courses or is on an alternate program)

d)    a 24 hour support services plan is designed and implemented between agencies.

e)    supports will include some of the following
    - structured experiences to facilitate concept development
    - parental instruction and facilitation
    - provision of adult supervision for safety reasons
    - provision of adult supervision to facilitate and promote socially appropriate behaviour
    - instruction to promote use of visual and hearing abilities
    - instruction in the use of technologies
    - interventions designed to deal with out of control behaviour
    - instruction in problem solving and conflict resolution
    - instruction in personal health care procedures

 

 Children/Youth living in Environments which are not responsive to their needs

The identification process yields information on the anticipated levels of support required by each child/youth who is living in an environment which is not responsive to his/her needs. The information is used to organize and prioritize services. The following system is used to profile the level of intensity of supports required in specific areas for children/ youth who find themselves in environments which do not facilitate healthy growth and development:

 

Level 1: Intermittent

Level 1 means that this child/youth requires between 1 and 6 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

When a child/youth requires Level 1 support it means:

a)    supports are required on an "as needed basis"

b)    short term supports will be needed periodically throughout the child’s/youth’s life to compensate for the supports/experiences which cannot be provided by the family/significant others.

c)    some areas of development are as expected for the child’s/youth’s age

d)    supports may include
    - periodic support from an early childhood educator and/or respite worker and/or special educator
    -social skills/play skills instruction/modeling
    -pre-requisite skills training/instruction where this cannot be provided in the home
    - monitoring of needs and strengths to ensure gaps are not developing
    - provision of materials and equipment which families are unable to provide, at a specific point in time, but which are necessary to promote healthy growth and development

 

Level 2: Limited

Level 2 means that this child/youth requires between 7 and 12 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

When a child/youth requires Level 2 support it means:

a)    supports are needed consistently over time

b)    interventions may require fewer staff members and cost less than more intense levels of support

c)    supports will be required until the child’s/youth’s life circumstances change

d)    there is an ISSP in place which outlines the areas in which the child/youth needs support to offset the constraints imposed by the circumstances in which the child finds him/herself; instructional support required to offset areas where the parent/care giver cannot support the child are identified and supports offered.

 

Level 3: Extensive

Level 3 means that this child/youth requires 13 to 18 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

When a child/youth requires Level 3 support it means:

a)    supports encompass regular involvement in more than one environment (home, learning environment, community)

b)    supports are put in place for the long term unless the child’s/youth’s circumstances change

c)    there is an ISSP in place

d)    supports will include some or all of the following
    - ongoing concept/ academic instruction
    - supplies
    - materials
    - tutorial support
    -access to community groups
    - access to early childhood/special education supports

 

Level 4: Pervasive

Level 4 means that this child/youth requires 19 or more hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

When a child /youth requires Level 4 support it means:

a)    the child and family require pervasive supports if the child/youth is to be maintained in the home

b)    the child/youth cannot keep pace with his/her peers without constant support- psychological and physical

c)    if this level of support is unsuccessful, the child may have to be moved to a more supportive environment

 

Children/Youth with Exceptional Abilities (Gifted)

The identification process yields information on the anticipated levels of support required by each exceptionally able child/youth. This information is used to organize and prioritize services. The following system is used to profile the level of intensity of supports required in specific areas for exceptionally able children/youth.

 

Level 1 : Intermittent

Level 1 means that this child/youth requires between 1 and 6 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

Supports are provided on an "as needed" basis for children/youth who do not always need support(s), or they can be short-term supports which are needed during transitions. Some examples would include access to learning materials and language experiences not normally found in an early childhood program setting; enrichment units which are provided on an occasional, as needed basis or a "speaker series" where guest speakers provide information to interested children/youth on a topic on a "one time" basis.

 

Level 2 : Limited

Level 2 means that this child/youth requires 7 to 12 hours of service per week, it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required

Supports refer to an intensity of supports characterized by consistency over time, still a relatively low level of support but on a regular basis. Examples would include a child/youth who is working with a mentor and who needs periodic but regular meetings with an educator to assess the achievement of a contract or goals; or enrichment cluster groups where children/youth meet for enrichment activities on a regular basis. The child/youth may have an individual support services plan for a limited aspect of their program (school-aged children/youth are basically following the prescribed curriculum).

 

Level 3 : Extensive

Level 3 means that this child/youth requires 13 to 18 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required

Supports are characterized by regular input (e.g, daily) in a least some environment (e.g, early childhood programs, classroom, resource room, community environments) and not time-limited (e.g, long-termed learning support). This would include Individual Support Services Plans whereby the children’s/youth’s program/curriculum is modified and different from that of his/her peers. It could include a child/youth working on an independent project; independent study route; perhaps with a mentor; working on an individualized accelerated program or working within an individualized contract for most or all of his/her program.

 

Level 4 : Pervasive

Level 4 means that this child/youth requires 19 or more hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required

Supports are characterized by constancy and high intensity and are usually provided across environments. Children/youth requiring a comprehensive level of support would be on a completely modified program in early childhood setting and/or alternate curriculum in school as specified by the ISSP and would likely be accessing different environments from his/her peers (e.g, a research facility, a post-secondary institution, working closely with a mentor; children/youth may demonstrate high levels of creativity yet may be underachieving within some of the prescribed curriculum for school aged children or may display challenging behaviours).

Children/Youth who have Health Impairments/Handicaps

The identification process yields information on the anticipated levels of support required by each child/youth with a health impairment/handicap. This information is utilized to organize and prioritize services. The following system of profiling the level of intensity of supports required is used:

 

Level 1: Intermittent

Level 1 means that this child/youth requires between 1 and 6 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

When a child/youth requires Level 1 support it means

a)    supports must be provided on an "as needed" basis

b)    he/she may be independent in normal circumstances but require support when conditions change or environments are new

c)    she/he may be independent unless she/he experiences a growth spurt or a relapse in his/her condition

d)    health care professionals will teach the child/youth the skills she/he needs as she/he grows and develops or while current treatments are underway.

e)    his/her condition is relatively stable

 

Level 2: Limited

Level 2 means that a child requires between 7 and 12 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

When a child/youth requires Level 2 support it means:

a)    supports are consistent over time and are only required at specific times in the day, unless unusual circumstances exist.

b)    interventions may require fewer staff members and less cost than more intense levels of support

c)    support, in the form of materials/equipment or personnel, is required for short periods throughout the day

d)    the equipment, materials, facilities may not be present to support the child’s/youth’s independence

e)    there is an ISSP in place

 

Level 3: Extensive

Level 3 means that a child requires 13 to 18 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

 

When a child/youth requires Level 3 supports it means:

a)    supports encompass regular involvement in more than one environment (early childhood program/school, home, community)

b)    supports are not time limited. It is projected that long term supports are required where

    -equipment and/or materials to support the child’s/youth’s independence is not provided
    -the child’s/youth’s condition is unstable but not life threatening unless exceptional circumstances exist
    -the child’s/youth’s condition is expected to deteriorate but is stable at this time
    -the child’s youth’s needs are complex and he/she cannot learn the skills to promote independence until she/he reaches the appropriate level of maturity

c)    there is an ISSP in place

 

Level 4: Pervasive

Level 4 means that a child requires 19 or more hours of service per week: it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

When a child /youth requires Level 4 support it means:

a)    there is an ISSP in place

b)    support is required for the majority of each day

c)    the child’s health condition is unstable and life threatening

d)    monitoring and supervision by a health professional(s) is required

e)    skills to ensure appropriate levels of care are taught to the parent/guardian, early childhood personnel, respite workers, and school personnel.

 

 

Children/Youth who have Hearing Impairments

The identification process yields information on the anticipated levels of support required by each child/youth with a hearing impairment which is used to organize and prioritize services. The following system of profiling the level of intensity of supports required is used:

 

Level 1 : Intermittent

Level 1 means that this child/youth requires between 1 and 6 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

 

Support must be provided on an "as needed basis". The supports are characterized by their episodic nature. The child/youth may be seen on a biweekly or monthly basis to monitor hearing aids and child’s/youth’s progress in early childhood program/school.

 

Level 2 : Limited

Level 2 means that this child/youth requires 7 to 12 hours of service per week, it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

The intensity of supports is characterized by consistency over time. The child/youth is usually seen by an itinerant teacher of the hearing impaired for 3 - 5 sessions per week. This level of support would permit the child/youth to:

a)    complete the activities/program within the same time frames as his/her non-disabled peers with instruction in the compensatory skills

b)    complete the activities/program within the same time frames as his/her non disabled peers with the support of an early childhood educator/special educator

c)    complete basic life skills as expected for his/her age

 

Level 3 : Extensive

Level 3 means that this child/youth requires 13 to 18 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

Supports are characterized by regular involvement in more than one environment (home, early childhood program/school, community) and they are not time limited (e.g., deaf students who require ongoing intervention in language based skills and who require the services of a trained intervention worker/teacher of the deaf on an ongoing basis because:

a)    their hearing loss is profound in nature

b)    the compensatory skills require direct instruction during the day (cannot be taught in any other environment)

c)    interventions include frequent direct language instruction, modification to materials, re-teaching or teaching or pre-requisite concepts and modifications to methods or evaluation for the school-aged child/youth

 

Level 4 : Pervasive

Level 4 means that this child/youth requires 19 or more hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

Supports are characterized by their constancy and high intensity across all environments. Children/youth require this level of support if they

a)    are deaf

b)    require structured language experience throughout their waking hours (e.g., ASL, social).

c)    require programming at the School for the Deaf

Children/Youth with Learning Disabilities

 

The identification process yields information on the anticipated levels of support required by each child/youth with a learning disability. This information is used to organize and prioritize services. The following system is used to profile the level of intensity of support required:

 

Level 1 : Intermittent

Level 1 means that this child/youth requires between 1 and 6 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

 

Supports must be provided on an "as needed basis". The supports are characterized by their episodic nature; the child/youth does not always need the support(s) or short-term supports needed during life-span transitions.

a)    when child enters an early childhood program

b)    when child enters school

c)    when child/youth moves to a new school

d)    when youth prepares to exit school

e)    when pre-requisite skills are absent

 

Level 2 : Limited

Level 2 means that this child/youth requires 7 to 12 hours of service per week, it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

Supports are characterized by consistency over time, time-limited but not of an intermittent nature, may require fewer staff members and less cost than more intense levels of support.

The child/youth requiring Level 2 supports can:

a)    complete the program/curriculum within the same time frames as his/her non-disabled peers if he/she is provided instruction in compensatory skills or environmental/materials adaptations are accommodated and early childhood/special education interventions are provided via an ISSP.

b)    independently manage within known situations

c)    independently complete basic life skills as expected for his/her age

 

Level 3 : Extensive

Level 3 means that this child/youth requires 13 to 18 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

Supports are characterized by regular involvement in more than one environment (eg. home, early childhood program/school, community) and they are not time-limited, children/youth who require ongoing learning and compensatory skills supports, requiring an ISSP or if:

a)    their learning abilities and, therefore, functional skills change

b)    the compensatory skills require direct instruction

c)    interventions include new technology and subsequent training program modifications, modification to materials, significant environmental adaptations, re-teaching or teaching of pre-requisite concepts, and for the school aged child modification to methods of evaluation.

 

Level 4 : Pervasive

Level 4 means that this child/youth requires 19 or more hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

Supports are characterized by their constancy and high intensity, they are provided across all environments.

The ISSP must be designed and implemented to ensure that skills are learned in and/or generalized to routine environments (environments where the child/youth normally accesses).

The school aged child/youth accesses the appropriate pathway to graduation.

 

 Children/Youth with Mental Health Needs

The identification process yields information on the anticipated levels of support required by each child/youth with a known mental health need. This information is used to organize and prioritize services. The following system is used to profile the level of intensity of support required:

 

Level 1: Intermittent

Level 1 means that the child/youth requires between 1 and 6 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

When a child/youth requires Level 1 support it means:

a)    supports must be provided on an "as needed" basis

b)    he/she may be independent in normal circumstances but require support when stressors increase

c)    he/she may be independent unless he/she experiences a relapse in his/her condition

d)    health care professionals will teach the child/youth the skills she/he needs as she/he grows and develops or while current treatments/interventions are in process.

e)    his/her condition is relatively stable

 

Level 2: Limited

Level 2 means that a child requires between 7 and 12 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

When a child/youth requires Level 2 support it means:

a)    supports are consistent over time and are only required at specific times in the day, unless unusual circumstances exist.

b)    interventions may require fewer staff members and less cost than more intense levels of support (e.g. the child/youth benefits from group therapy)

c)    support, in the form of materials/equipment or personnel, is required for short periods throughout the day

d)    the child/youth is relatively independent as long as he/she follows his/her therapeutic regime and/or take his/her medications

e)    there is an ISSP in place

 

 Level 3: Extensive

Level 3 means that a child requires 13 to 18 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

 

When a child/youth requires Level 3 supports it means:

a)    supports encompass regular involvement in more than one environment (early childhood program/school, home, community)

b)    supports are not time limited. It is projected that long term supports are required where

    - natural supports to enhance the child’s/youth’s independence are unable/ not provided
    - the child’s/youth’s condition is unstable but not life threatening unless exceptional circumstances exist
    - the child’s/youth’s condition is expected to deteriorate but is stable at this time
    - the child’s youth’s needs are complex and he/she cannot learn the skills to promote independence until she/he reaches the appropriate level of maturity

c)    there is an ISSP in place

d)    the child is receiving the services of a mental health professional/educational psychologist/guidance counselor

 

Level 4: Pervasive

Level 4 means that a child requires 19 or more hours of service per week: it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

When a child /youth requires Level 4 support it means:

a)    there is an ISSP in place

b)    support is required for the majority of each day

c)    the child’s health condition is unstable and life threatening

d)    monitoring and supervision by a mental health professional(s) is required

e)    skills to ensure appropriate levels of support are taught to the parent/guardian, early childhood personnel, respite workers, and school personnel.

f)    admission to a health care facility is being considered while the child’s/ youth’s needs remain at this level of intensity.

g)    the child/youth receives regular intervention by a mental health professional/ educational psychologist/guidance counselor

 

 

Children/Youth who have Physical Disabilities

The identification process yields information on the anticipated levels of supports required by each child/youth with a learning disability. This information is used to organize and prioritize services. The following system is used to profile the level of intensity of support required.

 

Level 1 : Intermittent

Level 1 means that this child/youth requires between 1 and 6 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

 

Supports must be provided on an "as needed basis". The supports are characterized by their episodic nature; the child/youth does not always need the support(s) or short-term supports are needed during life-span transitions

a)    when a child enters an early childhood program

b)    when child enters school

c)    when child/youth moves to a new school

d)    when a youth transitions to a post secondary institution or community living

e)    when pre-requisite skills are absent

f)    when they have outgrown orthotic/prosthetic devices and are awaiting replacements

These intermittent supports may be high or low in intensity when provided.

 

Level 2 : Limited

Level 2 means that this child/youth requires 7 to 12 hours of service per week, it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

The intensity of support is characterized by consistency over time, time-limited but not of an intermittent nature.

The child/youth requiring Level 2 supports can:

a)    complete the activities/curriculum within the same time frames as his/her non-disabled peers if he/she is provided via an ISSP instruction in compensatory skills or environmental/material adaptations, or early childhood/special education interventions.

b)    independently manoeuvre within known environments, with or without adaptive equipment/mobility aids

c)    independently complete basic life skills, with or without environmental adaptations or adaptive equipment

 

Level 3 : Extensive

Level 3 means that this child/youth requires 13 to 18 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required

Supports are characterized by regular involvement in more than one environment (eg. home, school, community) and they are not time-limited. Children/youth who require ongoing academic and compensatory skills supports, require an ISSP, if:

a)    their physical abilities and therefore functional skills change

b)    the compensatory skills require direct instruction

c)    interventions include new technology and subsequent training program modifications, significant environmental/materials adaptations, re-teaching or teaching of pre-requisite concepts, and for the school aged child/youth modification to methods of evaluation.

 

Level 4 : Pervasive

Level 4 means that this child/youth requires 19 or more hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

Supports are characterized by their constancy and high intensity, they are provided across environments. These children/youth have ISSPs.

Children/youth require this level of support if they:

a)    require direct instruction in concept development, materials - managements, use of adaptive equipment/technologies, life skills and compensatory skills

b)    need adult supervision/assistance to complete basic life skills

c)    require adult supervision to ensure their care, welfare, safety and security is maintained at all times

d)    must be assisted or supervised to move between environments

e)    find their physical condition is deteriorating rapidly and/or is becoming life threatening

f)    require health care procedures completed for them

The ISSP must be designed and implemented to ensure that skills are learned in and/or are generalized to routine environments.

 

 Children/Youth who have Speech and/or Language Disabilities

The identification process yields information on the anticipated levels of support required by each child/youth with a speech and/or language delay/disorder which is used to organize and prioritize services. The following system of profiling the level of intensity of supports required is used:

 

Level 1 : Intermittent

Level 1 means that this child/youth requires between 1 and 6 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

 

The supports are characterized by their episodic nature. The speech/language pathologist may choose to follow the child indirectly to ensure that they have the necessary environmental support for maintaining the current communicative status, to reevaluate progress, and modify program as necessary.

 

Level 2 : Limited

Level 2 means that this child/youth requires 7 to 12 hours of service per week, it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

Level 2 supports are characterized by consistency over time but not of an intermittent nature because of the child’s/youth’s needs to :

a)    learn language concepts which facilitate communication

b)    be provided experiences which would facilitate/maximize their utilization of language and/or speech

 

Level 3 : Extensive

Level 3 means that this child/youth requires 13 to 18 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

Level 3 supports are characterized by regular daily involvement in more than one environment (e.g., school, home or community) and not time limited. (For example a child with a phonological disorder who receives support from early childhood/special educator each day in conjunction with service from speech/language pathologist). The child/youth has an ISSP.

 

 

Level 4 : Pervasive

Level 4 means that this child/youth requires 19 or more hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

Level 4 supports are constant and intense and are provided across all environments. Children/youth who require this level of support have a speech and/or language impairment which prevents them from communicating effectively in early childhood/school and/or social situations. For the school aged child, curriculum evaluation methods are individualized. Support services are documented in an ISSP.

Level 4 supports are required where a child/youth

a)    is learning to utilize an augmentative communication device or alternate communication system

b)    the child/youth is non-verbal and others cannot interpret his/her communications

 

 Children who are Victims

The identification process yields information on the anticipated levels of support required by each child/youth with needs which result from being victims of emotional, sexual and/or physical abuse. This information is used to organize and prioritize services. The following system is used to profile the level of intensity of support required:

 

Level 1: Intermittent

Level 1 means that the child/youth requires between 1 and 6 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

When a child/youth requires Level 1 support it means

a)    supports must be provided on an "as needed" basis

b)    he/she may be independent in normal circumstances but require support when stressors increase (e.g. when preparing for a court case)

c)    he/she may be independent unless she/he experiences interactions with the perpetrator

d)    mental health professionals will teach the child/youth the skills she/he needs as he/she grows and develops or while current court proceedings/interventions are in process.

e)    his/her condition is psychological and health condition is relatively stable

 

Level 2: Limited

Level 2 means that a child requires between 7 and 12 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

When a child/youth requires Level 2 support it means:

a)    supports are consistent over time and are only required at specific times in the day, unless unusual circumstances exist.

b)    interventions may require fewer staff members and less cost than more intense levels of support (e.g. the child/youth benefits from group therapy)

c)    support is required for short periods throughout the day

d)    the child/youth is relatively independent as long as he/she follows his/her therapeutic regime and attends appointments with designated professionals

 

Level 3: Extensive

Level 3 means that a child requires 13 to 18 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

 

When a child/youth requires Level 3 supports it means:

a)    supports encompass regular involvement in more than one environment (early childhood program/school, home, community)

b)    supports are not time limited. It is projected that long term supports are required where

    - natural supports to enhance the child’s/youth’s growth and development and deal with past circumstances are unable/not provided
    - the child’s youth’s needs are complex and he/she cannot develop the skills to deal with the past or implications for the future or until he/she reaches the appropriate level of maturity required to deal with current circumstances

c)    there is an ISSP in place, where interventions need to be coordinated between two or more agencies, the child’s/youth’s course load at school is reduced, or time is taken from the curriculum to provide therapeutic interventions.

d)    the child is receiving the services of a mental health professional/educational psychologist/ guidance counselor

 

Level 4: Pervasive

Level 4 means that a child requires 19 or more hours of service per week: it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

When a child /youth requires Level 4 support it means:

a)    there is an ISSP in place

b)    support is required for the majority of each day

c)    the child’s mental health is unstable or fragile

d)    monitoring and supervision by a mental health professional(s) is required

e)    monitoring is required by a educational psychologist/guidance counselor when the child is in school

f)    skills to ensure appropriate levels of support are taught to the parent/guardian, early childhood personnel, respite workers, and school personnel.

g)    admission to a health care facility is being considered while the child’s/ youth’s needs remain at this level of intensity.

h)    the child/youth receives regular intervention by a mental health professional/ educational psychologist/ guidance Counselor

 

 Children/Youth who have Visual Impairments or are Blind

The identification process yields information on the anticipated levels of support required by each child/youth with a visual impairment which is used to organize and prioritize services. The following system of profiling the level of intensity of support required is used:

 

Level 1 : Intermittent

Level 1 means that this child/youth requires between 1 and 6 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

 

Supports are provided as needed. The supports are episodic since the child/youth does not always need support(s) or short-term supports needed during lifespan transitions:

a)    when a child enters an early childhood program

b)    when a child enters school

c)    when the child/youth moves to a new school

d)    when pre-requisite skills are absent

e)    when a child/youth enters a leisure/recreation program.

These intermittent supports may be high or low intensity when provided.

 

Level 2 : Limited

Level 2 means that this child/youth requires 7 to 12 hours of service per week, it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required

The intensity of Level 2 supports is characterized by consistency over time. They are time-limited but are not of an intermittent nature, requiring fewer staff members and less cost than more intense levels of support.

The child/youth can:

a)    complete the program/curriculum within the same time frames as his/her non-disabled peers if he/she is provided instruction in the compensatory skills and for school aged children/youth, special education interventions

b)    independently manoeuvre within known environments

c)    independently complete basic life skills as expected for his/her age

 

 Level 3 : Extensive

Level 3 means that this child/youth requires 13 to 18 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required

Supports are characterized by regular involvement in at least some environments and are not time-limited. Children/youth with low vision who need ongoing learning/academic and

compensatory skills supports requiring an ISSP require Level 3 supports where:

a)    their eye condition is degenerative in nature

b)    the compensatory skills require direct instruction during the day at the early childhood program or at school. (cannot be taught in any other environment)

c)    interventions include Orientation & Mobility training, technological training, modification to materials, re-teaching or teaching of pre-requisite concepts, modification to methods of evaluation.

Children/youth who are blind who need ongoing learning/academic and compensatory skills support requiring an ISSP and Level 3 supports if:

a)    the compensatory skills require direct instruction during the day

b)    interventions include Orientation & Mobility training, technological training, modification to materials, re-teaching or teaching of pre-requisite concepts, modification to methods of evaluation

 

Level 4 : Pervasive

Level 4 means that this child/youth requires 19 or more hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required

 

Supports are characterized by their constancy and high intensity; they are provided across environments. Children/youth require this Level 4 support if they:

a)    learn via the tactual mode requiring direct instruction in concept development, orientation and mobility, life skills and compensatory skills

b)    require special transportation

c)    need adult supervision to complete basic life skills

d)    require adult supervision to ensure that their care, welfare, safety and security is maintained at all times

e)    must be assisted to manoeuvre between environments

The ISSP must be designed and implemented to ensure that skills are learned in and/or generalized to routine environments.

 

 Children/Youth who have needs but the reason is Unknown

The identification process yields information on the anticipated levels of support required by each child/youth with needs which result from unknown circumstances. This information is used to organize and prioritize services. The following system is used to profile the level of intensity of support required:

 

Level I: Intermittent

Level 1 means that this child/youth requires between 1 and 6 hours of service per week; it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

 

Level 2: Limited

Level 2 means that this child/youth requires between 7 and 12 hours of service per week: it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

 

Level 3: Extensive

Level 3 means that this child/youth requires between 13 and 18 hours of service per week: it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

 

Level 4: Pervasive

Level 4 means that this child/youth requires 19 or hours of service per week: it does not necessarily mean that 1:1 support is required.

 

 Refer to any other section in the degree of need to find specific information which will help you fill out the profile. Feel free to refer the sections which help to describe that aspect of the child’s youth’s needs.

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wpe7.gif (1277 bytes)Have you read Step 5?

Interpretation of the Degree of Need

 

Step 6: Determining whether a child’s/youth’s need are met and where they are met

 

Next you are asked to note whether the child’s/youth’s needs are met and if not their exact status. This code, which is shown on the left, is in the second last statement on the profile form itself and should read as follows:

"X" write "X" in the column when this need does not apply to this particular child

"N" write "N" in this column where the needs have been identified but the team has been unable to provide the human or material resources to meet the child’s/youth’s needs

"Y" write "Y" in the column where the child’s/youth’s needs are being met

"S" write "S" in the column where the chid’s/youth’s needs are met some of the time but resources, materials and/or human, are unavailable to ensure his/her needs are met 100% of the time they are required

"P" write "P" in the column where the human and/or material resources are in the process of being secured to ensure that the child’s/youth’s needs are met.

Also, you are asked to note whether the child’s/youth’s needs which are being met are being met in the region or outside; those that are note "met". Are the potential resources available in the region or would have to be accessed outside the region (in another region).

"I" write "I" in the column, after you have noted either X, N, Y, S or P as outlined above, to indicate that the child’s/youth’s needs are being met in the region

                    "O" write "O" in the column, after you have noted either N, Y, S or P                       as outlined above, to indicate that the child’s/youth’s needs are                       being met outside the region

For example, by referring to the column on the left, one can infer by reading "Needs Met" column that the child’s needs are met (Y) and these needs are met outside the region (O)

This would indicate that the caregiver must travel to another region, by choice or because services are unavailable in the region, to ensure the child’s need are met.

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wpe8.gif (1277 bytes)Have you read the information outlined in Steps 5 & 6 explaining how to interpret the degree of need and how to note whether and where needs are met. If not, please do so before proceeding to Step 7

 

Step 7: Assistance to Move (physical)

If you ask the question "Does this child/youth require assistance to move?" and the answer is "No" then you would move quickly down to the columns titled Degree of Need and Needs Met and put "Xs" in the columns. Then proceed to the next major column entitled Behaviour

If you ask the question "Does this child/youth require assistance to move?" and the answer is "Yes" then you would read each of the following questions and using the information given in Step 5 fill in the appropriate information.

"a" Does this child/youth require assistance to move to and/or from transportation eg., in order to access early childhood or school programs or leisure/recreation programs? If yes, write "a" in the column under Degree of Need and write the corresponding number representing the degree of need

For example, if the child needs 6 hours of service per week to access appropriate programs then you would note "1a" in the column and if the needs are in the process of being met in the region you would note "P" and "I" in the Needs Met column.

"b" Does this child/youth require assistance to move to and from room to room in his/her home, early childhood program school or recreation/leisure activity? If yes, write "b" in the column under Degree of Need and write the corresponding number representing the degree of need.

For example, if the child/youth needs 15 hours of service per week to access appropriate programs and learning opportunities in school and in the community, you would note 3b the column and if the needs are not met but could possibly be met in the region, you would note "N" and "I" in the Needs Met column.

"c" Does the child/youth require supervision to move from space to space because of his/her physical disability? If no write "c" in the column under Degree of Need and write the corresponding number representing the degree of need.

For example, if this question does not apply to the child/youth write "O" in the column under "Degree of Need" and "X" in the column under "Needs Met" as shown in the example on the left.

"d" Does the child/youth require an adult to lift or transfer him/her from place to place or from one piece of positioning equipment to another? If yes, write "d" in the column under Degree of Need and write the corresponding number representing the degree of need.

For example, if the child/youth needs 8 hours of service per week, note "2d" in the column and if the needs are being met not "Y" in the "Needs Met" column

"e" Does this child/youth require an adult to position him/her in specialized desk or equipment provided for the purpose? If yes, but the child can provide help or the need is less intense than it would be if the equipment were not available or was not customized or the child had outgrown it then you would note "e" in the column under Degree of Need and write "E" (indicating that the equipment is vital to the child’s/youth’s level of independence) before it then write the corresponding number representing the Degree of Need.

For example, if the child/youth needs 2 hours of service because the appropriate equipment is available then note "1" before "E" - "1Ee" and if the needs are being met in the region note "Y" and "I" in the Needs Met column

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Step 8: Behaviour

This column is designed, where a child/youth is known to demonstrate behaviour which presents challenges to the family and/or service providers, to determine the nature of a child’s/youth’s behavioural difficulties

The codes utilized are:

 

"a"    is written in the column where the child/youth has injured himself/herself or others and requires support to ensure that such incidents are not repeated or skill instruction needs to occur.

"b"    is written in the column where the child/youth needs assistance to stay on task

"c"    is written in the column where the child/youth needs assistance/supervision to ensure socially acceptable behaviours

"d"    is written in the column where the child/youth is absent from school and there is not apparent valid reason to explain those absences

"e"    is written in the column where the child/youth is deemed to be out of control by the support services planning team

For example, in the column on the left, you will note that the child/youth has injured himself/herself or others and requires constant (pervasive) support or instruction (Level 4). Also this child/youth requires support to ensure socially acceptable behaviours. Since this level of need is also at Level 4, it would indicate that the children will need support across more than one environment (early childhood education setting/school and/or home and/or community). His/her needs are sometimes (S) met in the region (I).

 

Step 9: Compensatory Skills

 

This column is designed to capture this information which relates to the skills required by an individual if he/she is to function to the maximum of his/her potential.

The codes utilized are:

"a"    is written in the column where the child/youth needs to develop the skills required to move independently, safely and purposefully through the environment. This includes around spaces/rooms, from space to space, and around his/her community. A child with a severe visual impairment or difficulty with spatial orientation (possibly due to a brain injury) could require this support.

"b"    is written in the column where the child/youth requires support or skills instruction to ensure his/her safety when he/she is functioning independently.

"c"    is written in the column where the child/youth requires social skills instruction. This could apply to children/youth who present with any of the primary areas of need.

"d"    is written in the column where the child/youth requires activities of daily living completed for them or where the child requires guidance or hand over hand support or instruction to learn how to complete these activities as independently as possible. This code could apply to children/youth presenting with any of the primary areas of need.

*For example, in the column on the left you will note that this child/youth requires between 1 and 6 hours of support or instruction per week to address his/her needs in the area of "c" - social skills, and "d" - activities of daily living. The supports could be available in the district (I indicating available in the district) but at this point in time the individual support services planning team is unable to obtain the supports required (as noted by the "N")

 

Step 10: Well Being

 

This column is designed to address some of the most critical areas which influence the child’s well being. These issues relate to the child’s/youth’s emotional and physical health. This column is not designed to capture how the needs are met, for example through group or individual responses, but is designed to capture an array of needs which the team may be problem solving around to ensure that the needs are met.

The codes utilized are:

"a"    is written in the column where the child/youth requires supportive interventions as a result of a problem related to alcohol or drug addictions

"b"    is written in the column where the child/youth requires protection or where there are safety issues which need to be addressed in collaboration with the relevant social worker(s)

"c"    is written in the column where the child/youth is in conflict with the law and requires support to address his/her needs

"d"    is written in the column where the child/youth is developmentally delayed (between the age of 0 and 8) and requires support in any environment to move through the developmental milestones and proceed through life with his/her peers

"e"    is written in the column where the child/youth requires support to access or participate in leisure activities

"f"    is written in the column where the child/youth requires nutritional counseling as a result of an emotional disorder, i.e., anorexia (refusal to eat), or health impairment, i.e., diabetes

"g"    is written in the column where the child/youth requires counseling for personal or emotional reasons

 "h"    is written in the column where the team has determined that the child/youth requires respite services

"i"    is written in the column where the team determines that there is no designation for a particular need but that need should be profiled.

For example, the child described in the lef hand column requires addictions counselling as noted by "1a" but is not receiving the service (noted by the "N") and if he/she were to access the service it would have to be done outside the region (noted by the "O"). Also he/she requires access to the leisure/recreational activities (noted by the "1e") and these supports have been acquired (noted by "Y") and they were acquired outside the district (noted by the "O")

 

Step 11: Personal Care

 

This column is designed to address personal care and health needs.

The codes utilized are:

"a"    which is written in the column where the child/youth is unable to administer his/her medications independently and where the parent/guardian/significant other is not present to administer the medication

"b"    which is written in the column where the child/youth is unable to catheterize himself/herself and requires hands on or instructional support

"c"    which is written in the column where the child/youth requires support to eat by mouth. This could refer to the child/youth who needs an adult other than a family member/significant to feed him/her, assist him/her with eating by mouth, or preparing food for eating, i.e., cutting food and opening packages

"d"    which is written in the column where the child/youth requires food taken through a nasogastric tube (a tube inserted through his/her nose into his digestive tract). In cases where the feeding process must be completed by a caregiver who is not a member of his/her family or an individual designated by the family (i.e., close personal friend) then the need would be documented by noting a "d"

"e"    which is written in the column where the child is fed via a gastrostomy (a tube which is inserted in the child’s stomach via his/her abdomen)

"f"    which is written in the column where the child/youth who has diabetes, requires support with the measurement of his/her glucose (sugar) levels and the administration of insulin and his/her family or natural supports are not available to meet his/her needs

"g"    which is written in the column where the child/youth requires the administration of oxygen and his/her family or natural supports are not available to meet his/her needs

"h"    which is written in the column where the child/youth requires support to complete personal hygiene activities, including bathing, grooming and dressing and natural supports are available

"i"    which is written in the column where the child/youth requires a caregiver other than his/her family or natural supports to suction (clear the back of the throat by using a tube which is attached to a suction machine) him/her

"j"    which is written in the column where the child/youth requires support to attend to his/her toileting needs where the support of his/her family or other natural supports are unavailable

"k"    which is written in the column where the child/youth requires ventilator therapy (electrical support to facilitate breathing)

For example, the child/youth referred to in the column to the left on the previous page needs to be catheterized (as noted by the "b"( but as long as the equipment and facilities are available to him/her (as noted by "E") then he/she is independent. Presently the child’s/youth’s needs are met (as noted by the "Y") and they are met in his/her region (as noted by the "I")

Step 12: Program Material

This column is designed to address the need for resources which will facilitate the child’s/youth’s ability to learn concepts and access learning experiences if materials are provided in the appropriate format.

The codes utilized are:

"a"    which is utilized where the child/youth needs to hear (audio) information and could not access the information from other formats

"b"    which is utilized where the child/youth needs to access information by using the movement of his/her fingers over a series of raised dots called braille

"c"    which is utilized where the child/youth needs to access information via a computer disk or the Internet

"d"    which is utilized where the child/youth cannot utilize a low vision aid such as a magnifier to read normal size print and requires access to large print, in reading materials, pictures, maps and mathematical and scientific information

 "e"    which is utilized where the child/youth requires information which is hands on, such as tactile maps, manipulatives for science and mathematics, early childhood experiential materials to facilitate concept development

"f"    which is utilized where the child/youth requires information in a visual mode such as pictures, concept drawings, time lines

 

Step 13 : Speech/Language/Audiology

 

This section refers to areas of concern related to language development and acquisition, difficulties related to quality of verbal output (speech), and the need for an audiological (hearing) profile for children/youth who may be suspected of having associated hearing difficulties. Also, children/youth who are non-verbal would be profiled in this section.

"a"    is written in the column where the child’s/youth’s needs relate to his/her ability to make sounds or form words clearly

"b"    is written in the column where the child’s/youth’s needs relate to his/her ability to speak with fluency

"c"    is written in the column where the child/youth is having difficulty acquiring language and their language is delayed. He/she may have a known learning disability which is language based or may have a hearing impairment

"d"    is written in the column where the child/youth is experiencing difficulties with his/her voice and requires the intervention from a specialist for remediation or to learn new skills

"e"    is written in the column where the child/youth is unable to use his/her voice to communicate. The child may be using an alternate communication system such as pictures, symbols, bliss symbolics or sign language

 "f"    is written in the column where the child/youth requires an audiological profile (comprehensive assessment of their hearing)

* For example, the child described in the column on the left requires extensive (Level 3) support in more than one environment (home and/or early childhood program/school and/or community) because he/she is nonverbal (as indicated "e"). His/her needs could possibly be more intense if he/she did not have access to the appropriate communication device (indicated by the "E"). His/her needs are met (as indicated by the "Y") and the needs are met in the region (as indicated by the "I")

Step 14 : Technology

 

Many children/youth with special needs depend on technology to communicate, learn new concepts, access their environments, and increase their level of independence. This column is designed to capture the amount of technology to be used or required by children/youth in your community/region.

The following codes which are designed to capture the information should be written in the column under degree of need where they apply to a particular child/youth:

"a"    is written in the column where access to an appropriate communication device is required. These devices include symbol boards, voice output computers, canon communicators, braillers, just to name a few

"b"    is written in the column where access to devices which assist the child to hear are required. These could include hearing aids and FM systems

"c"    is written in the column where access to devices which will enable the child to manage his/her own environment, care or learning process are required. These could include grab bars, steps, grips, stabilizers, talking watches, talking calculators, raised line paper just to name a few

"d"    is written in the column where access to a device(s) which will facilitate independent movement are required. These could include wheelchairs, scooters, adapted bicycles, adapted sleds.

"e"    is written in the column where access to a device(s) which will facilitate reading is required. These could include reading stands, magnifiers, voice output computers, braillers, tape recorders

"f"    is written in the column where access to a piece of technology will enable the child to complete his/her own research during the learning process. For example this could mean access to a computer and the Internet for children/youth with exceptional abilities to learn or with a learning disability or visual or hearing impairment

"g"    is written in the column where access to a variety of seating devices is required. A child/youth could require different seating devices from his/her peers if he/she is going to be able to participate in activities with peers. These could include floor sitters, specifically designed chairs, car seats, wheelchairs.

"h"    is written in the column where access to devices which will enable the child/youth to see more of his environment are required. These could include magnifiers, telescopes, special software programs on a computer

"i"    is written in the column where access to devices which will allow the child/youth to take writers, communication devices, braillers or computers

* For example, the child/youth described in the column on the left requires access to equipment (as indicated by the "E") for more than 19 hours per week (as indicated by the "4") in order to hear (as indicated by the "b"). The equipment is available and his needs are met (as indicated by the "Y") and the equipment was obtained outside the region (as indicated by the "O"). Also this child/youth requires equipment (as indicated by the "E") in order to do research (as indicated by the "f"). He/she needs access to technology for 7 to 12 hours per week (as indicated by the "2") but unfortunately his/her needs are not met (as indicated by the "N") and the technology is not available in the region (as indicated by the "O") which means it would have to be obtained outside the region.

Step 15 Program

 

This column is designed to indicate the type of program the child/youth is/should be accessing.

To assist in the collection of this data, six codes are outlined (see column on the left)

"a"    refers to early childhood programs which include programs in preschools, family resource centers, nursery schools, as well as early intervention programs and pre-kindergarten programs

"b"    indicates that the child/youth is registered on the provincially prescribed curriculum and he/she can master the objectives of the curriculum without supports

"c"    indicates that the child/youth is registered on the provincial curriculum but he/she requires support from a special educator and/or tutor

"d"    indicates that the child/youth is taking courses which have been enhanced (as indicated by the diget "8" in the course number) or changed by modifying or deleting more than 50% of the objectives (as indicated by the digit "6" in the course code). This code does not apply to children/youth who require alternate forms of evaluation or extended time frames for evaluation in order to demonstrate their mastern of content

"e"    indicates that the child/youth is taking courses which are different from those precribed by the province

"f"    indicates that the child/youth is on an entirely alternate curriculum which covers the domains of academics, self concept/self esteem, functional skills, non scheduled time, decision making, sexuality, communication and social development. Where the child/youth is assigned an alternate curriculum he/she should not be taking alternate, modified or prescribed courses.

For example, the child described on the left requires access to an early childhood program (as indicated by the "a") for 19 or more hours per week (as indicted by the "4"). He/she is accessing a program (as indicated by the "Y") and is doing so in the region (as indicated by the "I")

 

Summary

If you have completed the profile, you would have completed 15 STEPS which are as follows:

 Step 1 Regional Information

Step 2 Name, Date of Birth, Legal Status

Step 3 Primary Area of Need

Step 4 Age/Grade

Step 5 Interpretation of the Degree of Need

Step 6 Determining whether a child’s/youth’s needs are met and where they are met

Step 7 Assistance to Move (physical)

Step 8 Behaviour

Step 9 Compensatory Skills

Step 10 Well Being

Step 11 Personal Care

Step 12 Program Material

Step 13 Speech/Language/Audiology

Step 14 Technology

Step 15 Program

 

When you are satisfied that it is complete, please forward it to the Regional Child Services Coordinator for your region. Please check the list below for the address of the Child Services Coordinator in your region

Eastern

Child Services Coordinator
Community Health - Eastern
P.O. Box 38
Whitbourne, NF
A0B 3K0

 

Central

Child Services Coordinator
Community Health - Central
143 Bennett Drive
Gander, NF
A1V 2E6

 

Western

Child Services Coordinator
Community Health - Western
P.O. Box 156
Corner Brook, NF
A2H 6C7

 

Northern

Child Health Officer
Grenfell Regional Health Services
St. Anthony, NF
A0K 2S0

 

Labrador

Health Labrador Corporation
P.O. Box 190, Station "A"
Happy Valley - Goose Bay, Labrador
A0P 1S0